Most people I know are keen to be known for producing high quality work. Occasionally, I have been in situations where I’ve been required to do things of the “so bad that they’re good” variety, but these are few and far between.

Since each person is likely to have a different idea of what “high quality” actually is, there are times when disagreements occur, in the context of work and other parts of life.

Years ago, a neighbour asked to follow me to a performance of mine. I willingly allowed her to join my team, travelling to the venue, going through the whole process of doing the show and then returning home.

Later on, I heard from a mutual acquaintance that I wasn’t open to criticism, since I didn’t ask this neighbour for her opinion of how the event went. I was triggered into resentful feelings, since I wasn’t looking for validation, hadn’t charged her to attend the event and she asked if she could join us in the first place.

Feedback and advice can be useful when there is a genuine curiosity to know the adviser’s opinion. One can always aim to do one’s best, but the terms of reference for assessing what that is should come from within