In a group conversation, I found myself at odds with some domineering personalities when I dared to say that I find nightclubbing dull and uninteresting. How could anyone not want to be distracted by flashing lights and thumping beats?

There was a time when I took a professional interest in clubbing. In those days, my fellow performers were preoccupied with cultivating something that was described as an “image”. It was important to keep tabs on what folks were wearing.

I was also interested in dance floor culture. Why did certain types of rhythm patterns, chord progressions, vocal performances or mixes of musical texture and timbre have more of an impact on punters than others?

It was also intriguing to find out what made one city different to another, through experiencing the way that clubbers would interact with each other.

Perhaps my curiosity was for anthropological research more than anything else. Eventually I came to the conclusion that nightclubbing is good for superficial engagement with fellow humans. If I really wanted to know who a person was, then it would make more sense to find ways of teasing out information through conversation, than to base my character assessments on what they looked like when they dressed up and danced.